Sr505 With A Slight Twist, Need Advice

Discussion in 'Restoration & Repair' started by Randy Dunn, Jul 7, 2020.

  1. Randy Dunn

    Randy Dunn New Member

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    Hi everyone, I'm new here. need advice..
    and first I'll sum up.
    I've got a "just out of warranty" Ibanez Sr505 with a neck problem. this bass is near mint, want to save it.
    the "B" side (top while playing) of the fret board is nice and straight (removed neck from body)
    but the "G" side, first 3 frets from nut dips a little when sighting down edge. so looking from bridge end, down edge of neck, the last 3 frets dip down, then from about the 4th to the bridge is straight. I tried a photo,,, hard to keep all in focus but you can see the "dip"
    it's about just shy of 1/2 the thickness of the fret board. so i get string buzz with any acceptable action on the smaller strings.
    Ibanez offered to sell me a new neck for $600. Ha! I say.
    so I'm thinking about removing the fret board and block sanding the neck to level it.
    need advice. would that be the way to go?
    thank you.
     

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  2. Timm

    Timm New Member

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    Hi Randy,

    first I have to say that I'm more of a builder than a repairman, but I have dealt with twisted necks before. Removing the fretboard and sanding the neck down with a sanding beam can be tricky. First, check what kind of trussrod you have and make sure that it is not sitting right underneath the fretboard (like a dual-action rod). When you sand down the neck, you will lose a bit of thickness (probably ok). Depending on how much material you have to remove you can also lose width due to the neck shape, then you have to reshape and refinish the transition to the fretboard edge. Definitely a major project.

    Half of the fretboard thickness (so approx. 3mm?) seems a lot for a distance of 4 frets. It's hard to see in your picture.

    Another way to go would be pulling the frets out, leveling the top of the fretboard with a radius sanding block and then do a refret. It's a little bit less invasive, but requires proficiency in fretwork. Then you'll have to do the whole process of leveling, crowning, dressing and polishing, but you probably have to a little fret levelling anyways after you glue the fretboard back on in your suggested method. If your frets are in less than perfect conditions anyways, this would be the route I'd take.

    Check out this video of Ben Crowe/Crimson guitars on fixing a twisted neck:
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2020
  3. Randy Dunn

    Randy Dunn New Member

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    Thank you Timm,
    I've watched that video,,, was thinking i should pull the board.... but now see otherwise.
    so i measured with a straight edge (with notches for the frets) after making sure the neck was as straight as I could.
    on the one bad side its just shy of 3/32" just before the nut and flat after the 3rd fret,,,, and flat as a pancake on the other.
    I've done the whole process of leveling, crowning, dressing and polishing, on a bunch of MIM strats over the last few years.
    never re-fretted. but either I fix the neck or it's toast. so I guess I figure out the radius and get a Radius sanding block.
    any advice or videos on re-fretting that anyone here suggest? should /i get a fret press or make one?? I guess a video or two are in order
     

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