Squier Stratocaster Restoration

Discussion in 'Restoration & Repair' started by harriswho, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. harriswho

    harriswho New Member

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    Hi,
    I am trying to restore a 96 Squier stratocaster that came in white. I have sanded off the color on the body using 100 and 150 sanding paper and did the whole job (not yet finished) by hand.
    I have noticed that there are several dull light areas on the wood that appeared when sanding off the color. At first i thought that there was something wrong in my sanding technique but no matter if I sand them further down or sand an area that is not dull further down it doesnt seem to change anything.
    Have anybody come across this or knows what to do further with it?
    Will it be ok once I stain the guitar or will it always show like that?

    P.S. if anyone knows what type of wood is this it would be great to know.
     

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  2. CatonGuitars

    CatonGuitars Member

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    You've sanded through the sealer coat to the bare wood in those areas. Not a big deal. Happens every time. This was sprayed with polyester. Next time try a heat gun to remove the bulk of the finish. Dont worry about it unless you intend on spraying a transparent finish. Just level it and respray a good sealer coat. If you want a transparent finish then all the old sealer as to be removed and the body has to be nice and clean of any old finish or those spots will always have a subtle hue difference.
     
  3. harriswho

    harriswho New Member

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    Thanks for the reply, appreciated.
    I'll give it a go sanding further down the clear areas in an effort to remove the sealer coat to the whole body.
    I am going to be staining the guitar and then oiling it with multiple coats of tru-oil so I really don't know if its gonna show or not but mentioning now that do you think i need to go down to bare wood in order to stain it?
     
  4. CatonGuitars

    CatonGuitars Member

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    You cannot stain sealer. It needs to be 100% removed. When I do re-fins I always recommend not staining the wood but to tint the finish if color is wanted. Once wood has been sprayed you can never really tell exactly how the finish has effected it or how deep the finish has penitrated the fibers. This looks to be a basswood body which readily pulls in finish and stains. You would be amazed at how clean a body can look but have deeply penitrated finish. Staining can easily turnnout blotchy. Plus this is a multiple piece body. It looks to me like the section on the bass side will turn out much different than the treble side. I dont want to discourage you, just want you to be aware. It could very possibly take a stain nicely. Just make sure that ALL of the old finish is removed and the body is cleanly sanded to at least 320 grit. Do not sand across the grain. On basswood i would sand to 400 if staining.
     
  5. harriswho

    harriswho New Member

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    Thanks again for a thorough reply. I closely inspected the piece especially around the strap holes and indeed it seems that under the color there is an extra transparent coat that probably is the poly. I'll make sure I sand it down to bear wood.
    I don't mind much about the color differences between the three pieces as this is my first attempt to restore a guitar and I'll like it and keep it whatever it turns out to be.
    I do it mostly for the first experience.
    I'm actually not planning to go for a spray gloss finish but rather a tru oil building of sealing layers.
    I'll keep updating this thread as I go as it would be nice to have an experienced eye like yours overlooking this venture.
     
  6. harriswho

    harriswho New Member

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    Turns out you were totally right. I sanded further down the body and all areas became even as now all the old primer is removed.

    Since you've told me that its basswood I've been doing a lot of research on how I should go about painting it and polishing it.

    A lot of people do agree that basswood is highly absorbent and recommend a sealer such as shellac or some wood conditioner that will prevent the stain from soaking up and help it spread evenly.

    I wanna make sure however that I sand down the surface correctly and prepare it well. Right now I've been using 100 to 150 grit paper since the paint and primer were really hard. Should I move on to 200-220 and then 400? Also I've watched on a video that there are 2 types of sanding paper measurements, European and American and that I should be paying attention to that cause they really different?
     

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