Question on Fretboard Sanding

Discussion in 'Guitar Building' started by BleedingGums, Apr 25, 2013.

  1. BleedingGums

    BleedingGums New Member

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    I have been working on my first fretboard and finally got my inlays glued in. The inlays are celluloid (hand cut from celluloid blank purchased from Rockford Carving (ebay seller partsforguitars) set in a rosewood board. I have level sanded the board with 150, 220, 400, & 600 grit paper. The board feels smooth as glass, but if you look closely at the inlays you can still see slight striations:
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    [​IMG]

    So my question is, should I keep sanding until these striations disappear? I cannot feel the striations with my fingers. Is there another step to polish the inlays smooth, or should I just keep sanding?

    On another note, I filled the edges around the cavities with rosewood dust and CA glue. The dust itself was much lighter in color than what can be seen in the pictures, but it seems as though the CA glue (which was clear) made it much darker. Curious to know if I had used clear epoxy if the color would have not turned out so dark.
     
  2. AwDeOh

    AwDeOh New Member

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    I personally think those lines look awesome - it gives it a brushed aluminium look. But if you do want to get rid of them, yep just keep sanding up through the grits. Once you hit something like 1200, it'll start to shine.

    With the filler, it's always wise to mix a little and apply it on a scrap piece of work. If you use PVA, Titebond or similar instead of CA, you'll get more working time with it, so you can mix it on a palette like a painter does.

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACHki_NIsTM]basic inlay technique part 2 - recessing the cavity and gluing in the new guitar inlay - YouTube[/ame]

    That's the guy from Crimson Guitars doing it, see 9:00 onwards.
     
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  3. TKOjams

    TKOjams Well-Known Member

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    keep sanding the board and inlays with 800, 1000, 1500, and 2000 using a circular motion with the final two grits. In the end you'll have inlays that are very shooth with no sanding lines.

    Ken
     
  4. BleedingGums

    BleedingGums New Member

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    Thanks guys. So once I get to the 1500 & 2000, I will be sanding without the radius block, correct? So far, all of the sanding has been straight back and forth the length of the fretboard with the radius block.

    As far as the inlay fill is concerned, I filled the edges with rosewood dust and then wicked the CA in. Ironically, I was worried that the the fill color was going to be too light as the rosewood dust (from this same board) was actually a much lighter color.

    P.S. - AwDeOh, love the screen name. Had to do a double take but I it got it on the 2nd try.
     
  5. TKOjams

    TKOjams Well-Known Member

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    Correct, once you get to the higher grits you really don't have to warry all that much about changing the radius while sanding. It's just smoothing out the sanding line from the previous higher grits. You could also use a tiny bit of auto swirl remover and a rag to buff the inlays to a super high gloss finish.

    Ken
     
  6. emoney

    emoney New Member

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    If, like a lot of us, you have one of those large Dremel "kits", this is also a good time to use those little buffing wheels and compound that came with it.
     
  7. TKOjams

    TKOjams Well-Known Member

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    Yep, but buff them at a slow speed, celluloid will melt or burn very easily. To borrow a phrase from emoney......"it happened to a friend of mine" :naughty:
     
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  8. MikeP

    MikeP Member

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    Mixing the dust with any glue is going to darken it because you're effectively wetting it which makes anything darker (pour water on a blue T-shirt and the wet area turns dark blue). Different glues darken more/less than others so experiment on scrap. I've found that Tightbond ends up making things lighter than CA, as does mixing in a LOT of dust. I probably wouldn't go with Titebond around inlays, so try epoxy (longer mixing time than CA) and lots of dust.

    Mike
     
  9. BleedingGums

    BleedingGums New Member

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    I have the buffing wheels but no compound. Does anyone know if Brasso or even toothpaste would work? I often use these (mostly Brasso, toothpaste only in a pinch) & a rag to polish scratches out of CD's/DVDs. Works real well.

    As far as the celluloid being combustible, when I was shaping the inlays on my ROSS, I had one take off on me but luckily I was able to put out the fire before it did any damage (it only burned up the waste material).
     

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