Hand Tool Build #3 - "Shredder" for my cousin

Discussion in 'Guitar Building' started by poro78, Jun 19, 2014.

  1. HEADKNOCKER

    HEADKNOCKER Active Member

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    I see the electro socket now that you've pointed it out..
    I couldn't even imagine anyone using the factory Tele style socket that requires the special tool to compress the springy metal clip..
     
  2. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Phew, another busy week and only some baby steps in the workshop.
    Some work with the control cavity.

    From this...

    [​IMG]

    ...to this. Quite simple task with the router plane.

    [​IMG]

    Then again the old paper tracing trick, forgot the proper term for this again. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Ripped some wengé for the cover.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then it was just shaping and fitting and shaping and fitting...

    [​IMG]

    ...and planing and scraping the cover flush with the body.

    [​IMG]

    Oh, and the recessed jack fits quite nicely also.
    I still need to sand the edges of the hole, but everything fits in tightly and there's room for the jack and wiring behind the jack plate/cup.
    (I almost got the jack plate jammed inside that hole when testing the fit, that piece of string is there to help me yank it out. [​IMG])

    [​IMG]

    Can't say I enjoyed that task. Too stressful and quite difficult without power tools. :rolleyes:
     
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  3. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Alrighty then.
    Life was in the way of the guitar building for a moment again, but things are getting clearer and clearer.
    I'm starting in a new (old) job tomorrow and that means we are getting closer to get rid of this apartment...
    So maybe in a year or so I'll be having a better workshop - without whiny neighbors. [​IMG]

    Anyhoo, some work done also.
    Lately I've been just rounding and smoothing the edges of the top with scrapers and razors.

    [​IMG]

    And of course I've wrecked the binding in couple of spots and now I'm waiting for the goop patches to dry.
    Then I have to check how visible the damage is and so on. [​IMG]

    I've also started to do some samples.
    Black flamed top.
    Stained first with a light black mix, sanded back, then stained again with a really strong black mix.
    (The piece on the bottom had a different ratio with too little black.)

    [​IMG]

    From another angle. The chatoyance is quite nice already, I wonder how it looks when I put some finish on these.

    [​IMG]

    I'm going to try two finishes.
    One is 2-component wipe on poly and the other is Sam Maloofish finish, basically a mixture of boiled linseed oil, Tung oil and varnish.
     
  4. sosay

    sosay Member

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  5. sosay

    sosay Member

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    cool man, good stuff,so what problems are you having with the wenge,i was planning to use a wenge top for my telecaster but the guy in the timber place said there wenge timber is only 3 inches wide so i might be using african spalted beach for body top,one piece,it looks like an interesting wood,im using african walnut for the fretboard, have you ever used or know anything about walnut?
     
  6. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Well, wengé is quite painful to work with: it's hard and really splintery. But also really beautiful wood.
    The splinters are also toxic (meaning the saw dust is also bit harmful) and hurt like hell, and the wounds from them also get inflamed really often.
    It's so hard that it dulls the blades really fast and if you're working it with dull tools, you get tears and gouges. Also if you work against the grain, you get tears and gouges.
    That's why I hate wengé. ;)

    Walnut is also quite hard, but a bit easier to work than wengé. I have a walnut top bass build going on in the background, but I haven't had time or mood to build anything for ages...
     
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  7. Renkenstein

    Renkenstein Well-Known Member

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    Still avoiding Wenge. ;)

    ...and you're still faster than me.
     
  8. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    Been a year now, still around poro?
     
  9. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Sheesh, a year. Still alive and around, but all my builds have been on hold and I even haven't had time to visit the forums much.
    Last two years have been like riding a roller coaster without brakes.
    Trying to get some time to restart soon, not making any promises though.
     
  10. VictOr358

    VictOr358 Member

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    YAY!! The Moose is back! Yes-yes-yes! \m/ -O- \m/.
    This hobby does not get cured by Guitar Builder Anonimous, no? ))
    Let's see those shavings, cuts, blisters...

    I'm truly glad you're back to business, Poro!
     

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