60's Kay K-300 Restoration

Discussion in 'Restoration & Repair' started by basskidd, Oct 26, 2015.

  1. basskidd

    basskidd New Member

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    Howdy!

    This is my first restoration project, and I'm tackling an early 60's Kay K-300.

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    I'm still sourcing a couple parts, the most difficult to find being the bridge piece. I found the string claw and it's on the way right now. The bridge is proving difficult to find though haha

    The biggest issue I'm having as far as repairs go is the truss rod. It's sunk down into the neck and seems to be hooked on the anchor down in the neck...

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    I figure the best thing to do is going to be to remove the fretboard so I can get at the truss rod and either repair or entirely replace it. The thing that worries me is damaging the original inlays:

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    As far as the wiring goes, this is what I've come up with:

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    500k pots for tone & volume control, .047uF paper in oil tone caps for tone control and a 3 way rotary switch for pickup selection. I'm pretty sure I'll need to bridge the two pickup inputs to allow for a parallel pickup selection on the last two terminals of the switch.

    It's gonna be ongoing, most likely take a little while so stop by for (semi)regular updates!
     
  2. Duplex Dave

    Duplex Dave Active Member

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    Fun one! Since you will need heat the fingerboard for removal I would carefully try to remove the inlays if you plan on trying to keep them. Or, find some plastic MOP first and plan on replacing them towards the end of the repair. I don;t think they will survive the FB removal process if left in place.
     
  3. basskidd

    basskidd New Member

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    Good advice, thanks! I've been reading up on the process of removing the FB and there seem to be a few different opinions on the matter, I'll err on the side of caution and try and save them. I found a good workbench in the alley today but most of the supplies will have to wait until I get paid again hahaha
     
  4. basskidd

    basskidd New Member

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    Ok, so I have pretty much all of the parts I need to get the fun part of this going. I have one last item I need; the bushings for the bridge piece. I've checked StewMac and they don't have anything that would fit. Here are the specs I'm looking for, does anyone have another good source for parts like this?

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  5. CatonGuitars

    CatonGuitars Member

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    Ya those inlays should come out. They are probably celluloid nitrate if they get too hot they can catch fire.

    Ive had some good success with Just removing a few frets to get to the truss rod. If you can figure out under what fret the anchor is then you can remove just that fret and maybe the one before it. You can remove the anchor, tap the rod forward about 3/4" and re-anchor. That should be enough to get it back through the peghead access and a new nut on it. You may even be able to get to it by taking out the inlay and removing the material under the inlay (Ive done that a few times on old Fender Basses with Blocks and Binding)

    I hate to mess with old binding (which on this guitar are also celluloid nitrate) so if the rod needs to be replaced, you can remove the frets & inlays and just the very 1/2" center strip of the fingerboard from the nut to the last fret. Just drill a few tiny holes for registrating it later and take your sweet time with and x-acto blade and a razor saw. Then take even more time removing that strip. There is so much less stress on the neck by just removing this section and soooo much less work in the long run. Removing a whole finger board without damage is tough and it just never feels right on the edges after you glue it back on.
     
  6. basskidd

    basskidd New Member

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    That sounds really interesting but I don't have the tools for it just yet haha
    Where could I read about it though?
     
  7. Duplex Dave

    Duplex Dave Active Member

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    Did you check allparts.com for the bridge anchors?
     
  8. basskidd

    basskidd New Member

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    Yeah, either they don't have it or I don't know the correct search parameters to use haha
     
  9. CatonGuitars

    CatonGuitars Member

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    If you found the bridge for this guitar I would be amazed. Weren't the bridges on most of the Kay's just a rough shaped piece of rosewood? If it were mine I would just take a piece of rosewood and replicate it the best I could. I imagine that is what most people do. If it were in my shop that's what I would recommend. I would charge about $30 to make it, but it would be good wood and you would have it that day or the next. As for the bridge inserts...did this guitar come with inserts? Weren't they just screwed directly into the body with round head wood screws?
     
  10. CatonGuitars

    CatonGuitars Member

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  11. otterhound

    otterhound New Member

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    Been a while since I measured any , but those specs sure are close to standard Fender string ferrules .
     

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