Summer build

Discussion in 'Guitar Building' started by Marcus, Apr 9, 2014.

  1. Marcus

    Marcus New Member

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    Got the larger planks cut into fitting (almost) pieces yesterday. Today i glued the neckblanks tougether :ohno: It is my first time doing this, so i'm rather exited about how it turns out. The planning work didnt go so well, so i might try to set up a router-planning-jiggamathing tomorrow to get things all straightend out, though that will require me to buy a plate of MDF.
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  2. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    MDF is cheap! Never too much MDF in a shop :naughty:
     
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  3. Marcus

    Marcus New Member

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    Exactly! :D I took a sneakpeak at the joint, and it actually looks quite all right!
    Guess tomorrow will be planning the neckblanks, and planning the bodyblank :)
     
  4. ericschaeferguitars

    ericschaeferguitars Member

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    Wow, I really like that peghead design! I really need to start using autocad or some kind of software. Seems like it really cuts down on the time spent designing using french curves or other stone age implements
     
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  5. Marcus

    Marcus New Member

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    Today I got alot of work done! I made a template for the body, while my friend did the neck template (Teamwork, yay!). I then figured that my planning jig was a bit too risky, so instead I wisited a friend of the family, that had a industrial thickness planner :bowdown:. He then thinned my blank down to 4,1cm :D When i got home i smacked the template on and drew a couple lines, roughed it out, and routed for an hour or so. Got some bad tear outs though.. :mad: Anyhow, here's some picutres:
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  6. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    Yep, you'll learn quickly about how to route bodies :lol:
     
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  7. Marcus

    Marcus New Member

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    hopefully :lol: I Think I Will get a spiral bit for next time :) Now i wonder, how do i fil tearouts? I Will just sand some Of it away, but what if i Want to fix it :)?
     
  8. BWGuitars

    BWGuitars New Member

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    If you're doing a natural finish? You sand out the tearout :)
     
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  9. Heretic

    Heretic Well-Known Member

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    Disc sander.
     
  10. Marcus

    Marcus New Member

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    I used my homemade spindle sander, and it worked quite nice! No more tearout on this one, lesson learned for next time; Buy a spiral router bit :lol:
     
  11. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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  12. BWGuitars

    BWGuitars New Member

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    Honestly, when I was cutting body profiles with templates and pattern bits I always used straight bits. I didn't get into spiral bits until I got my CNC up and running. Just follow the rules in that link and you can have good results with a straight bit. Remove as little material as possible per pass and be aware of the direction the router spins so it doesn't yank your workpiece out of your hands.
     
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  13. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    I still occasionally have issues with a straight bit and that method, especially on mahogany. I try to be very careful, but sometimes it's unavoidable to have a piece chunk out. I'm thinking a spiral cut bit would alleviate those issues.
     
  14. Marcus

    Marcus New Member

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    Thanks guys! I should try taking off less material at a time, I think thats what caused the tearout. I will try to follow those next time :)!
     
  15. BWGuitars

    BWGuitars New Member

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    Soft, open-grained woods are just a bitch to work when you get to the endgrain with a router, no matter the method. I haven't tried spiral pattern bits, but I have no doubt that it would make life MUCH easier.
     
  16. Purelojik

    Purelojik New Member

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    man freud bits make quick work of end grain for me. So far if im using the red painted diabolo bits i wont have a problem. I usually use a diamond card to keep them super sharp. The stew mac pickup routing bits area also wonderfully sharp.
     
  17. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    Most of the things have already been mentioned. Rough out the body as close to the actual contour as you can and/or rout in multible shallow passes (!). Sharp bits are a big plus too. Spiral pattern bits may work even better, but this way might be fine with straight bits also. When I cut a body I want my router to cut like butter.
     
  18. Marcus

    Marcus New Member

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    Thank you all for the kind advice! I will remember these for next time i rout :) I tried to rout the trussrod channel today, and figured that my neckblank was not straight.. Guess i'll have to figure a way to make another blank
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2014
  19. Marcus

    Marcus New Member

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    Got the carve started today! I did not have a propper rasp laying around, so i picked one up at the local store. And it turned out that it was quite all right :)
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    In the end i wiped the wood over with a damp cloth:
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  20. Zeegler

    Zeegler Active Member

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    Looks like you made out ok with that rasp. I have a few cheap hardware store rasps that are absolutely useless. They might work on something soft like balsa wood, or maybe cheese, but for anything else completely hopeless. I have a few really nice ones that I got from StewMac and Lee Valley, and they really make all the difference. The Japanese Dragon rasps from StewMac are especially nice. They take wood away almost effortlessly. I also have a razor file from Lee Valley, and it's fantastic too. Oh yeah, the Microplanes are also great to have, and they're cheap as hell.
     
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