Odd characteristics when oiling rosewood?

Discussion in 'Guitar Building' started by Knarbens, Oct 10, 2015.

  1. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    Hey everyone ... I'm so helpless.

    I am about to finish a customers instrument and put like 6 coats of Danish Oil on the headstock which has a rosewood plate. I sanded off the headstock in between and started all over. Put some layers on without a problem. It has always looked wonderfull.

    Now, when I wanted to do the FINAL coat today the darker grain lines of the rosewood turned kinda dull. Don't know how to discribe it, but it looks as if the darker grain wouldn't keep the oil??? Like I said, the previous coats all looked perfect - even gloss all over the head.

    Does anyone have an idea, what is happening here?
    Thanks
     
  2. Zeegler

    Zeegler Active Member

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    Is it possible that the sanding dust clogged the pores of the wood in the darker areas? I'm totally guessing here. :scratch:
     
  3. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for not posting a picture. Here it is so you can see what I am talking about ...

    [​IMG]

    Those "unglossy" grain lines have never happend any coat before. Im pissed because I wanted to just do "that one last coat" and call it done and now I don't really know how to fix it.

    Any ideas? Would rubbing the headstock with mineral spirits and another coat of oil help?
     
  4. Duplex Dave

    Duplex Dave Active Member

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    Ok, I see what your talking about now I'm no expert on natural finishes but it looks like the area in question are not 'sealing' up, it's just absorbing the oil. I think shellac is commonly used in conjunction with oil based finishes, you could try to seal up what you've stated with a wash coat of shellac, then continue with your usual finish schedule.
     
  5. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    Yeah it looks that way. The strange thing is, with the previous coats it was an even gloss all over the headplate. Also, no problems on the cavity cover which is made from rosewood as well.
     
  6. Duplex Dave

    Duplex Dave Active Member

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    Hmm, did you use a different grit sandpaper than the other pieces of RW? Or, get some solvent on this piece that was not used on the others?
    Sometimes polishing the raw wood out to 600 grit or 1000, even steel wool can burnish the wood enough to keep the oil from not absorbing into it as much.
     
  7. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    Mmh, yeah ... that could be one reason. I went over it with 600 grid.
     
  8. Dave Weir

    Dave Weir New Member

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    Is it level? It doesn't look completely filled. It seems to me with the wiping oils you can either put 2-3 coats on and leave it at that or if you want it glossy you need to make sure the wood is very level.
    If it was my guitar I would put the 600 grit sand paper on a flat block and sand in some more oil, then wrap the block in a paper towel and wipe it back off. You may have to do this a couple times, but I think it will even it out.
    If you want to get a uniform low gloss you can sprinkle it with rottenstone or flea powder and rub it out with a paper towel. This will also make the back of the neck feel awesome.
    Very nice design by the way.
     

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