New Guy Neck Questions

Discussion in 'Guitar Building' started by Blake Hatton, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. Blake Hatton

    Blake Hatton New Member

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    Hello all,

    This is my first post here. I've been working on building my first guitar over the past couple months (a Les Paul with a cherry top), but have run into issue after issue with the neck. After deciding to redo the neck because the nut came out too narrow for my taste, I started on the new scarf joint today, and after gluing and sanding, I realized that the join was rather far forward- on the back of the headstock at the bottom, the beginning of the join is approximately an inch past where the nut is- I haven't measured exactly yet, but I will when I get a chance. I have a feeling this will only increase when the neck will be taken to its final thickness. However, on my Epiphone sg, the join is not quite that far forward. So my question is this: how do I stop my scarf joint from joining so far up the headstock? Or is it a problem? I realize that this is a little vague without pictures and I will post them as soon as I can.

    Thank you for any help.
     
  2. surveyor

    surveyor New Member

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    Without seeing what you are talking about, the only thing I could tell you is to get you some "expendable" stock the same thickness as your good stuff for the neck and start making "fake" necks. When you get it right to your thinking, measure everything carefully and reproduce it using the good stuff. The same goes for cutting dovetails and other parts also.
     
  3. bruce bennett

    bruce bennett Active Member

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    When I build a neck I tend to think of the Nut location and width as my Reference point, and everything is sorta built outward from it.
    I mean your fretboard is pretty much gonna be a set length with only a small variance at the body end being possible.
    and your headstock is similar, and trimming down from the outter ends is actually pretty easy.

    So, I work toward making the "nut pad" the most important location and measure outward from there. If you think about it, the nut and bridge locations really are the 2nd most important points on the guitar.
    (centerline being 1st)

    I made a neat little fixture that lets you glue up your scarf joint and kinda pick (within a limited range of course) where you want your nut to sit based on where the joint line falls.
    its important to note that the headstock angle you intend to use, will dictate somewhat where your joint line will fall within the neck too, so its best to draw it out on paper first.
    then there should be no surprises when you start cutting wood.

    If you Fail to make a plan, then you had better Plan to fail. (the Rev. Billy Gibbons told me that)
     
  4. Blake Hatton

    Blake Hatton New Member

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    I fixed my issue. I did my neck a little bit differently this time around in that I thicknessed the headstock before I glued it on, rather than after. I figured out that to bring my join forward, relatively speaking, was take wood off the top of the neck. So that's what I did. I created a template that matched the taper of the neck, traced it, and sanded.
     
  5. bruce bennett

    bruce bennett Active Member

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    if your happy with it, then ya can't ask for better right.

    I like to make the older early 80s style charvel/jackson type joints where the joint is under the fretboard myself. but as long as the joint stays together, then its all good.
     

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