Neck material alternatives to wood?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Knarbens, Nov 4, 2013.

  1. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    Is there any material aside from wood that can be used as a neck material?
     
  2. Murkar

    Murkar Well-Known Member

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    I have seen some very guitar necks made completely form carbon fiber :)
     
  3. Renkenstein

    Renkenstein Well-Known Member

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    Aluminum.
     
  4. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    I was expecting this answer.

    Do you know whether they've been hollow or solid?

    I wonder if it's possible to order a "carbon blank"
     
  5. TKOjams

    TKOjams Well-Known Member

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    acrylic.
     
  6. Murkar

    Murkar Well-Known Member

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    To be honest, I don't know whether carbon fiber necks are solid or hollow. I feel like it would be fibrous if you cut into it though, so I suspect that they're probably made in a neck-shaped vacuum mold layered with carbon fabric and epoxy rather than being cut from a blank.
     
  7. Decibel Guitars

    Decibel Guitars New Member

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    Moses Graphite necks are hollow. A solid carbon neck would be unnecessarily heavy, and structurally inefficient.

    Bamboo is also an excellent sustainable alternative to wood.
     
  8. Heretic

    Heretic Well-Known Member

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    Some builders make their carbon necks hollow. Some use a foam or obeche wood core as a positive mould.
     
  9. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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  10. KnightroExpress

    KnightroExpress Active Member

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    That's really interesting! It would be cool to use that as an alternative to foam in a carbon-wrapped neck.
     
  11. Luthier-Atlanta

    Luthier-Atlanta New Member

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    Groovy stuff;
    TECNARO is a producer of high-quality thermoplastics from renewable resources. The raw material is lignin, which is second only to cellulose as the most abundant natural polymer. Lignin is a by-product of the pulp industry and the volume arising worldwide is about 50 million tonnes per year.
    Mixing lignin with natural fibres (flax, hemp or other fibre plants) and some natural additive produces a fibre composite that can be processed at raised temperatures and, just like a synthetic thermoplastic material, can be made into mouldings, plates or slabs on conventional plastics processing machines. So this allows products such as computer, television or mobile phone casings to be made from "wood". These granules made from biorenewable materials are named ARBOFORM® (arbor, Latin = the tree).

    http://dornob.com/liquid-wood-fantastic-100-organic-bio-plastic-material/#axzz2kjn0Q76Y

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081202115326.htm
     
  12. Decibel Guitars

    Decibel Guitars New Member

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    Very interesting, indeed. I'm dying to get into 3D printing of guitars.
     

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