Mirante

Discussion in 'Wood' started by kenty83, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. kenty83

    kenty83 Member

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    Just throwing this one out there, but how reliable is merante for building guitars and necks? We've just had 2cube arrive at work for some windows and am trying to figure out if I can use the off cuts for guitar building.
     
  2. otterhound

    otterhound New Member

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    Never heard of it .
    Welcome ! :wave:
     
  3. kenty83

    kenty83 Member

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    I'll re spell it Meranti sometimes known as Lauan or Philippine Mahogany…
    And thank you by the way!
     
  4. evolved_insanity

    evolved_insanity Active Member

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    Extremely soft and tends to react severely to different climates. I wouldn't use it for much and especially not for guitar building.
     
  5. Sawdust Al.

    Sawdust Al. New Member

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    I've used it on bodies but its not very exiting stuff . Reminds me of school furniture for some reason. I used it for the back of this V [​IMG]
     
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  6. kenty83

    kenty83 Member

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    I've used it before and know its pretty bland but was considering it for a painted finish rather than stained! The dark red meranti is a bit more like sapele but still a bit soft.
     
  7. JSH

    JSH New Member

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    From the wood data base:

    Color/Appearance: Typically a dark reddish brown, or purplish brown: commonly with white resin streaks present.

    Grain/Texture: Has a coarse texture with medium to large pores. Grain is sometimes interlocked.

    Endgrain: Diffuse-porous; large to very large pores in no specific arrangement, few to very few; solitary and radial multiples of 2-3; tyloses occasionally present; parenchyma vasicentric, winged, and banded with embedded resin canals; narrow to medium rays, spacing normal.

    Rot Resistance: Reported as moderately-durable to non-durable in regard to decay resistance, but is susceptible to insect attack.

    Workability: Typically easy to work, though any interlocked grain can present problems during planing, and Dark Red Meranti is reported to have very poor steam-bending properties. Some species may have a slight blunting effect on tools due to small levels of silica present in the wood. Glues, stains, and finishes well.

    Odor: No characteristic odor.

    Allergies/Toxicity: Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Meranti in the Shorea genus has been reported to cause eye, throat, and skin irritation. See the articles Wood Allergies and Toxicity and Wood Dust Safety for more information.

    Pricing/Availability: Meranti is widely harvested and available worldwide. It should be moderately priced despite the fact that it is imported.
    Sustainability: Meranti is not listed in the CITES Appendices, but many species in the Shorea genus are on the IUCN Red List. The majority of Shorea species are listed as being critically endangered due to a population reduction of over 80% in the past three generations, caused by a decline in its natural range, and exploitation.

    Common Uses: Plywood, interior furniture, general construction, concrete forms, veneer, and boatbuilding.
    Comments: Sometimes referred to as Lauan, wood in the Shorea genus is very commonly used in southeast Asia, and there is an abundance of variety between the difference species: each with different working properties, appearances, and mechanical strength values.
    The five main groupings for Meranti (Lauan) are: Light Red Meranti, Dark Red Meranti, White Meranti, Yellow Meranti, and Balau.
    Also called Philippine Mahogany, Meranti bears no relation to what is considered to be “true” mahogany in the Swietenia and Khaya genera.
     
  8. kenty83

    kenty83 Member

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    Yeah that's pretty much the same as what's in my book, im making some windows out of it and some of the darker stuff is almost identical to sapele.
     
  9. kenty83

    kenty83 Member

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    Excuse my lack of knowledge but if people use cedar for guitars like the turned model 1 featherweight is meranti not close or still not use able?
     
  10. evolved_insanity

    evolved_insanity Active Member

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    Saying people use cedar for guitars is a blanket statement as was mine regarding the meranti. There are different cedars as there are different retail variations of meranti. Some are harder than most cedars and some are softer than other cedars. Using a dark red meranti (the hardest available) will yield a harder lumber (around 800 ish on the janka scale iirc). I still would not use it. Just as I wouldn't use most cedars.
     
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  11. LexiconDevil

    LexiconDevil New Member

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    meranti is what they gave to us kids in high school woodshop class.It was also often used in 60s & 70s japanese guitars that people frown on.
    Definitely wouldn't use it for a neck but a body 50/50 depending on my end game.
    Some sort of vintagesque type thing be it strat,jr,LP ect no way be reaching for a similar type of wood they used but something different with 4 toaster pickups, a jazz trem in an odd shape with lots of switches sure why not?
     
  12. kenty83

    kenty83 Member

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    I was thinking along the lines of a turner model 1 and depending on the grain veneering it.:D
     
  13. DRF

    DRF New Member

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    Fender uses Poplar and Ernie Ball uses Basswood, I don't see why not, as far as budget goes.

    Whenever I think of this type of "mahogany" I always think of trim used in older houses. There was a time when you could go to a home improvement store and they would have it in varying widths (up to 10in) and trims but always 7/8th inch stock, much like Home Depot now has in Maple, Oak and Fir etc.
     
  14. telebomb

    telebomb New Member

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    I used some for an acoustic neck build , a little softer than mahogany , make sure its quarter sawn . sands and finishes very nice .
     
  15. GuitarBuilder

    GuitarBuilder Member

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    The porosity is a non-starter for me!
     

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