I'm always paranoid that my epoxy won't cure properly.

Discussion in 'Guitar Building' started by Zeegler, Dec 27, 2015.

  1. Zeegler

    Zeegler Active Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2013
    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    69
    I use 5 minute epoxy mixed with fine sanding dust to glue in my inlays. I just did a huge gothic L inlay in an ebony fretboard for a bass I'm building. After all that work, I'm always so worried that the epoxy will stay soft and sticky. After 5 minutes it sets up, but it usually takes a few days for it to get hard enough to sand down. Is this normal? I'm using equal quantities of resin and hardener. Is it possible that adding the ebony dust is affecting the curing time?
     
  2. B. Howard

    B. Howard New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2015
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Hummelstown, Pa
    It is possible that the ebony dust has affected the chemical process. But it is more likely a temperature thing. Most epoxies want to be cured at 75F or above and even though it is a 5 minute epoxy if you read the TDS it likely states 24 hours for full cure.
     
  3. Zeegler

    Zeegler Active Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2013
    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    69
    The inlay I did yesterday is looking good and curing just fine. The epoxy is already very hard. Like I said, I think I'm just paranoid.
     
  4. Duplex Dave

    Duplex Dave Active Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2013
    Messages:
    443
    Likes Received:
    91
    Location:
    West
    Loctite 380 Black Max is a good choice for filler as well. It's black CA glue. I add some thick CA glue to it.
    Adding anything to a 2 part catalyzed product will effect it in one way or another, only use enough dust to achieve the color. Ground up quality charcoal is about as black as it gets, the natural mesquite stuff not the pre-made briquettes. Charcoal does not mix well with thin CA in my experiences.
    Always keep your mixing container/excess around to check the curing process.
     
  5. Michael_P

    Michael_P Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2014
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Austin
    if your epoxy doesn't cure, you'll know it...in a bad way...

    for what you're doing I think 5 minute stuff will be OK...in general I find the fast curing stuff way too brittle and usually fails over time.

    the only epoxy I've ever had not cure correctly was 35 years ago...epoxy based stuff for coating the windings holding the guides on a fly rod...that stuff didn't cure, and I found out after having put it in a sleeve a girl made me for a favor in HS, got stuck to said sleeve, and ruined both...considering I got the blank for the rod at cost I just threw it away...

    I will give my employer due credit: when the supplier of the stuff refused to warranty it (give me a break, I had made a LOT of rods by then, and was chemistry trained by that point in life...point being I didn't fekk up the mix) he refused to ever carry that product again...my employer? Neil Bohannon of The Fly Shop in Cupertino California...me? tied flies, taught classes at such, sold product, and made fishing rods from blanks...

    I know, it's not lutherie...but it is direct experience in epoxy not curing...
     
  6. HEADKNOCKER

    HEADKNOCKER Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    41
    Nothing like a hand made fly rod & hand tied flies..
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice