Hand Tool Build #3 - "Shredder" for my cousin

Discussion in 'Guitar Building' started by poro78, Jun 19, 2014.

  1. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Headknocker!
    Don't wait for "one day", just jump in. :yesway:
    P.S. Handling wengé barehanded, that's a real man's job. :rofl:

    Here's another episode of "Vine inlay - the hard way". [​IMG]
    After sending my sketches to my cousin and getting the green light, it was time to move the design to paper.

    [​IMG]

    Then paper onto MOP.

    [​IMG]

    Tools ready, new Iron Maiden album playing, here we go again.

    [​IMG]

    You know what they say about keeping your fingers clear of the cutting line?
    Well, I was sawing one piece and had to turn it around and start a cut from opposite direction to prevent it from breaking.
    "I'll just be really careful when the cutting lines meet", I thought.
    Yeah, right. [​IMG]
    Seems like jeweller's saw blades cut really nicely into flesh, even when you're really careful. Didn't go through the fingernail, though. [​IMG]

    (Note to myself: use a small spring clamp to keep the workpiece in place if it's uncomfortable to hold safely.)

    Combat Medicine 101 - wipe the blood, clean the wound and seal it up with some CA.
    Better than new, eh? [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    All the sawing done. Some filing and arranging ahead.

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. pshupe

    pshupe Member

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    Very nice.

    Cheers Peter.
     
  3. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Peter!

    Here's another little update.
    Attached the parts with tiny dabs of glue.

    [​IMG]

    Scribed the outlines really carefully.

    [​IMG]

    Internet magicks - fast forward couple hours of carving, sweating and swearing and the pieces are now inlaid.

    [​IMG]

    Next step is to fill all those horrible gaps, then some sanding, then the frets and the binding...
     
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  4. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    I've been spending a lot of my time at sales training lately (currently I'm a trainee in a small company, taking care of the marketing and sales), so the progress has been bit slow.
    And I've been too lazy to update all the minor things I've done in the workshop.

    While I was waiting for a new radius sanding block to arrive, I took a little sidestep and decided to shape the headstock veneer from the leftovers of the fretboard blank.

    [​IMG]

    Cut the rough shape with a coping saw and finished with the Microplane and Shinto rasps.
    Nice and fast work.

    [​IMG]

    And then it was time to put my new block plane into its first real test.
    Trimmed some fat off.

    [​IMG]

    A quick mock-up.

    [​IMG]

    Next step was rough sanding the radius with my brand new commercial radius block. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Done. No problems.

    [​IMG]

    Then it was time to make some mess... I mean fill some gaps with ebony dust and CA.
    The procedure also reveals sloppy inlay work. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    After that some more sanding, then some sanding and...sanding.
    Everything was fine until the last grit.

    Hyaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargggghhh! [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Eeeaaaaaaaaaaarggggghhh!!! [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (+ two more arghs.)
    The rest of the fretboard looks quite nice.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Coffee break, nervous breakdown, beer, cool down, Google & YouTube, regroup.

    While searching answers to couple of questions, I remembered that I had similar mishap with my first build... so no worries, eh?

    Applied some heat to the MOP with a pyrography pen (first time use, got it from my grandma earlier this year) while sliding a mini chisel under the inlay.

    [​IMG]

    Removing the inlays was easier than I remembered.

    [​IMG]

    So far so good.
    Now I need to make 4 new inlay pieces and carve the cavities a bit deeper.

    [​IMG]

    Oh well, what doesn't kill you... :rolleyes:
     
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  5. Duplex Dave

    Duplex Dave Active Member

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    Oh yeah, when the Mother of Pearl starts to turn blue, well, it sounds like you found out what's about to happen....
    You're doing a great job! Yourself and Barnaby are a fine example for the rest of us who rely on the power tools. You know that when one of our tables saws goes down we're going to be going through these threads on how to true up one edge of a board with the Jack plane, #6 and #7 plane.
    Keep it up, this has been a great thread to follow.
     
    poro78 likes this.
  6. VictOr358

    VictOr358 Member

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    Voi ei! Paska ja paska... Jumala... enough of that colloquial Finnish language, Master P. =)

    It does not kill you indeed. Even though I've done nothing more than MOP dots, I'd say 2 mm is a minimum.

    Pyrography pen? To me it looks like a thermo-rectal decryption device =)

    Stop hyaaaaaging, you're doing great. \m/
     
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  7. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    I've been off the game for almost a month, mainly because the crap storm of the year 2015 just doesn't seem to cease.
    Long story short - been really busy with the new job (sales & marketing trainee, I need to prove them I'm worth hiring) and on top of that lost a friend last month (brain stroke, gone without a warning) and I've been trying not to fall too deep into depression. Results have been various.
    Somehow I haven't really had the mind set to fix errors I've made with the inlays. :rolleyes:

    Anyways, life goes on.
    Today I got some pictures out of my camera and also some work done in the workshop.

    I cleaned up the cavities and copied the shapes of the cavities onto paper with this olden & golden method.
    Don't know the English term for this technique, but we used to "draw" coins and medals with this method when I was a kid. (The fretboard is under that paper)

    [​IMG]

    And then fast forward to this day.
    Nothing new in this, glued the templates, couple of noise CDs on, jeweller's saw. Go!


    [​IMG]

    And a little close-up.

    [​IMG]

    Not too bad. Filed them down to the outlines, but still had to do some work with the cavities, but they were almost good.

    [​IMG]

    I still need to carve more depth, this time I'll sink the MOP deep down.
    Hopefully I don't need to use too much filler, but the good thing is that the ebony is quite forgiving.
     
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  8. Duplex Dave

    Duplex Dave Active Member

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    Progress! Good to see you back in the saddle.
    We call your method of "drawing" coins and medallions "rubbing" sometimes "chalk rubbing" or "crayon rubbing". People like to use this technique on gravestones / headstones in cemeteries to. It is real handy in the lutherie world as well.
    It seams that sorrow is the price of admission to the happiness that life has to offer. All things pass.
    I'm going to start re-making my acoustic neck I destroyed about 2 hours ago. My duplicate carver was off a little bit and I turned my neck blank into scrap...off I go to lay out a new neck on some mahog.
     
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  9. GreaseBox

    GreaseBox New Member

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    Love the vine!!
     
  10. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Wow, almost 3 months since the last update. [​IMG]
    Well, I'm still alive and the project is still going on.
    I've made some progress with the build, but I've been mostly under the radar after the ****storm of 2015.
    So far 2016 has been bit better. [​IMG]

    Where was I? Oh, the inlay. Well, I got it fixed.
    I won't be inlaying the pieces before radiusing the fretboard anymore. Lesson learned.

    [​IMG]

    Next step was to put on some binding. Simple task, sloppy and messy work. Tried some glue this time, but I have to say I like acetone and goop more.

    [​IMG]

    And of course I forgot to check the fret slot depths before installing the binding... So it's Workshop McGyverism Time!
    A scrap piece of maple, a piece of old dozuki saw blade and a piece of paper with fret tang height marked.
    Saw a slot for the piece of blade, tighten it with a screw and you have a rough but working fret slot cleaning saw. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Some careful checking and sawing and the slots are now as deep as I need them to be.

    [​IMG]

    I've been thinking about when to do what and decided to fret the board after I have glued it on the neck.
    So next step was to make a truss rod cavity, another simple and fast task with router plane.

    Mark the spot, scribe the edges, plane, scribe deeper, adjust blade depth, plane, rinse & repeat until done.

    [​IMG]

    After making the truss rod cavity I started to fix couple of small tearouts and dips in the top and of course I had to tweak the neck angle and do some other cosmetic planing here and there.

    [​IMG]

    Tearouts and nasty grain are diseases. Meet the cure.

    [​IMG]

    Oops. Wrong one, here's the right.

    [​IMG]

    Bought two toothed plane irons. One for my block plane and other for my Stanley #4.
    The toothed iron leaves quite rough surface, but nothing a good scraper can't deal with.
    (Damn I hate that too long part at the neck... hopefully I can hide it with some strategic binding and staining... [​IMG])

    [​IMG]

    Looks more and more like a guitar after every session. [​IMG]
    (Yeah, and the part I hate will be mostly hidden under the fretboard, I only need to deal with the sides.)

    [​IMG]

    Alrighty then, next update won't take as long. I promise. [​IMG]
     
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  11. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Well, didn't take anywhere near 3 months. [​IMG]

    Since I don't have any clue what I'm doing, I decided to slice off some wood from the top.

    [​IMG]

    They say it's an arm comfort bevel or something like that.

    [​IMG]

    And then it was time for this week's patience training - binding the body.
    Never done it, but it sounds easy enough. Mark width, mark depth, remove excess.

    [​IMG]

    Careful carving with chisels. If the blade feels even a bit dull, I strop it instantly and if that doesn't help it's time to pick up the waterstones and sharpen.

    [​IMG]

    Rough work mostly done.

    [​IMG]

    The cutaways are still under work.

    [​IMG]

    And a sidestep... Remembered that I need to sign the headstock veneer.
    Fast sketching, good enough, go. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Something is wrong, I snapped only one blade while sawing. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Couple of tiny drop of glues helped to keep the inlay in place when I scribed the outlines with a leather sewing awl.

    [​IMG]

    Time to grab my mini chisel set again...

    [​IMG]

    Add some epoxy and ebony dust to the mix and the result is a mess.

    [​IMG]
     
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  12. jkes01

    jkes01 Active Member

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    Lookin good, really inspiring.
     
  13. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks!

    I went and bought el cheapo crappo heat gun.
    Can't really find a way to bend that binding otherwise. Tried and failed, I'll use some advanced technology on this task.

    [​IMG]

    Scraped the excess epoxy off the headstock, inlay looks quite ok.

    [​IMG]

    Back to the binding.
    Went the first round with the heat gun.

    [​IMG]

    Took a break and then went the second round with acetone.

    [​IMG]

    Oh, I followed wifey to the local flea markets on Sunday and found some dental instruments and couple of "window scrapers".

    [​IMG]

    I let the acetone dry over night (just because I used some goop to fix a spot) and scraped most of the binding flush and clean yesterday.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Not too bad.

    [​IMG]

    I still need to scrape the cutaways and fill couple of gaps, but overall it looks quite alright.

    [​IMG]

    Those shavings make excellent binding goop. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  14. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Surprise, surprise, another couple weeks delay.
    I got a nice case of flu (and sinusitis) and couldn't enter the workshop without discomfort.
    Anyhoo, today I got some work done. Removed all the traces of goop from the binding with scrapers and went all in and glued the fretboard.

    Couple of dry runs, couple dabs of silicone into strategic places under the truss rod and Thunderbirds are GO!

    [​IMG]

    Another scary, nerve-wrecking Clamping Hell(tm) [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    We'll see tomorrow how it went.
    Didn't get too much of squeeze out... and I think I might have heard a tiny cracking sound. [​IMG]

    I'll be crossing my fingers the whole night hoping that I didn't hear a piece of inlay cracking and just imagined the whole thing in my neurotic mind. [​IMG]
     
  15. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    In the heat of the Clamping Hell(tm) action, I lost (and forgot) the pieces of foam padding I was supposed to use between the fretboard and the radius blocks.
    Found them from the floor this morning. [​IMG]

    After hearing that tiny crack when clamping, I was bit nervous when I unclamped the package...
    And it didn't help at all that the second block I used as a clamping caul was attached to the fretboard. [​IMG]
    Wondered what foul magicks is behind all this and examined it closely.
    Luckily it wasn't foul magicks or sorcery as I saw a tiny amount of double sided tape residue at the bottom of the block.
    And seemed to be it was terribly fine double sided tape. It held really well, even with most of the tape removed ages ago. [​IMG]

    So, ahem... couple mild swear words... and couple more cups of morning coffee with my friend Google. Then it was time to use my brand new heat gun again.
    Applied some heat really, really carefully and got the block off without any damage. Didn't even melt the binding or rip the whole fretboard off. [​IMG]
    Some naphtha rubbing and the situation was again in control.
    Phew.

    Note to myself: When you're using radius blocks for clamping cauls...

    a) Check that there's no double sided tape residue left
    b) Remember to put something between the fretboard and the block


    P.s.
    Couldn't find any reasons for that tiny cracking sound.
    Might have been just the tension of the moment bursting some veins in my head. [​IMG]
     
  16. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    Glad nothing bad happened!
     
  17. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Well, this build has had more bad luck than any project I've ever been in. :rolleyes:
    But... Was mich nicht umbringt, macht mir stärker. :flex:
     
  18. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    Today's work.
    So, the fretboard is glued and seems to be in place and everything seems to be fine.
    (Have to remember to check the truss rod and hear if there's any rattle)

    Since this is the first neck-through for me, for time to time it feels like the first build.
    In Finnish we have saying "perse edellä puuhun", translation "climbing to a tree ass first" - and that's how this whole build feels sometimes, like for example, this morning. [​IMG]
    As I didn't shape the neck/center piece before gluing, now it was time to trim the fat. One fine example of perse edellä puuhun.

    Some measurements, a tiny bit of safe zone (marked with some tape), a bow saw and a mirror.

    [​IMG]

    Then I realized that it isn't as straightforward, because there is the upper horn in the way at the body end! I could go only so far that I wouldn't damage the horn... Argh. [​IMG]
    Well, that's just a minor obstacle. Nothing a chisel and a mallet couldn't handle.

    [​IMG]

    Loaded the CD player with some noise, pressed play and started sweating.
    The tape trick worked extremely well for me, it was easy to stay away from the taped area (the mirror on the floor helped to check the underside without crouching) and it didn't take all day to saw the fat off.

    [​IMG]

    Then the rest.
    First some saw cuts.

    [​IMG]

    And then it was the first time I actually enjoyed working with Wengé.
    (Until that evil devil wood bit me again! Forgot the how nasty the splinters are.[​IMG])
    The splintery nature made it easy to whack off the excess, the hardest part was to keep the cuts thin enough to prevent deep tearouts.

    [​IMG]

    Then some rasping and scraping and it started to look like something power tool guys could do in about 2 minutes. [​IMG]
    And what the whole session took me... umm... 2 hours maybe. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Then the sides.
    Marked the binding with a sharpie, so I could see when the edge was flush and used a block plane (with toothed iron) and my beloved Shinto rasp to do the rough work.

    [​IMG]

    When the fat was trimmed from the back and the sides of the neck, it was time for a quick mock up.
    Looks still funny because the headstock is just roughly shaped and the veneer isn't placed correctly.

    Anyways, trimming the fat off the neck was a big step for this chunk of wood to start look more and more like a real guitar. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    One more view of the backside of the neck.
    Soon it's carving time, which is one of my favorite tasks, yay! [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    But before carving the profile my spokeshaves and scrapers need some love, so that'll be tomorrow's agenda.
    We'll see if I have time to start the carving also.
     
  19. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    So, my lovely on/off sinusitis has lasted 6 weeks now, making any kind of woodworking really uncomfortable. Well, actually anything that involves doing something has been uncomfortable. [​IMG]
    But I'm feeling almost alright again and got some work done yesterday and today.

    Frets. Stainless steel, mm-mmm.

    [​IMG]

    Another episode of stupidity. Mark where to cut and use jeweler's saw to the task. [​IMG]
    Next time I might cheat with Dremel. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Since both of my earlier builds were with nibs, this was the first time I also had to trim the tangs.

    [​IMG]

    Dreadful task with the same jeweler's saw and some aggressive files.
    Since I don't have tang nippers, I tried ordinary cutting pliers, but decided to do it the slow and hard way.
    Used the saw to mark how far to file and spent a merry session with files.
    I also tried to saw the tang off, but it was too tricky and I have couple of nice files that made the task quite pleasant.
    Of course a Dremel would had been nicer. Maybe next time.
    Am I starting to lose my puritanical hand tool ethics? [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    All done. That's all I got done yesterday.

    [​IMG]

    And today it was time to bang 'em in.
    First I tried my rubber mallet, but somehow it felt useless, so I had to change my approach.
    First tapped them in lightly.

    [​IMG]

    And then banged them all the way in. Had some trouble with couple of frets, but nothing a small amount of violence couldn't fix.

    [​IMG]

    I'm not sure how I feel about these stainless steel frets. Maybe I'm not manly enough for them. [​IMG]
     
  20. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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    After good night's sleep I went and did a little feeler gauge test as I'm really neurotic again.
    The fretboard didn't pass it, so I thought this would be time for workshop McGyverism again.

    Since hammering wasn't good enough, how about pressing them rest of the way in?
    What do we have here... Hmm... An old drill stand from flea market, a small vise, some plywood and scraps... Yeah, it'll be great. [​IMG]

    Removed a jaw from the vise. That'll be my poor man's fret press caul.

    [​IMG]

    Attached it to the drill stand with some plywood and scrap.
    (Got bit lazy and didn't even shape the plywood, just took first big enough piece from my scrap box. It doesn't need to be pretty, it just keeps the pieces from falling. [​IMG])

    [​IMG]

    Oooooh! Feeler gauge test passed! It works!

    [​IMG]

    And yeah, it worked for 3-4 frets... and then my massive muscles just couldn't help themselves... All this strength was just too much for the stand and it broke under the stress. [​IMG]
    (No wonder that piece of excrement didn't cost much...)

    [​IMG]

    Luckily this mishap didn't damage the fretboard, but it was close. Too close again. [​IMG]
    Well, McGyverism mentioned. I guess that little trickery didn't please the spirit of McGyver and it gave a sign I had to put some more effort into it.

    Trimmed the damaged part off with a hacksaw and found just fine scrap piece of walnut that fit right between the edges of the frame.
    Drilled couple holes for chunky bolts and attached the piece of walnut.
    (There was also a small "lip" in the center of that frame, so I had to make a channel in the middle of the walnut so I could bang it in all the way.)

    [​IMG]

    Of course there was no simple way to attach the vise jaw to the walnut block with my limited resources, so I had to figure out a different solution.
    And didn't have to look too far - As I was putting the jaw away, I noticed it had a strip of metal attached into it. Nicely countersunk holes and all.
    Good enough for my poor man's fret press.
    Smoothed the sharp corners with a file and it was good to go.
    (Of course a real fret press caul with radius would be much better, but like I said: limited resources... [​IMG] )

    [​IMG]

    Back in action.
    I guess it's much slower and trickier than a real fret press, but all the frets passed the feeler gauge test after I was done.
    (The plastic part of the handle also broke in pieces during this task. Can't really describe the feeling when that too happened. [​IMG])

    [​IMG]

    And because I don't have good cutters, I need to trim the fat off the fret ends with a file. That's something I'm going to do tomorrow.
    Didn't take much effort to file couple of fret ends and luckily most of the frets have been cut quite close to the final length. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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