Fusion 360 Question

Discussion in 'Plans, Designs & Software' started by rainH2O, Nov 23, 2015.

  1. rainH2O

    rainH2O New Member

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    Does anybody know how to cut off and remove the section above the neck plane?

    [​IMG]

    I used the split body command to use the angled plane to split away the section into a separate body. When I try to delete the separated body, I get a message "This feature is referenced by other features in the timeline". After using the split body command, shouldn't I be able to chop this off without affecting anything else. I can't seem to make it work.
     
  2. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    I don't know anything about that software, so this could be a wild guess, but seeing as it's an Autodesk product...

    Is it possible to move the split plane to earlier in the timeline?
     
  3. rainH2O

    rainH2O New Member

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    Not sure about moving it earlier in the timeline. Any earlier and there is no surface to cut. Maybe make the neck plane cut after I loft the top carve, but before I convert the lofted surface from a BRep face to a T-spline face?

    Or maybe I could extrude the entire top .4 inches, cut my neck plane, then loft the top carve "inside" the extruded top and use the split body tool to cut away the extruded section I don't want (using the geometry of the top carve as my cutting tool).

    This also has me thinking that when I figure out what works for the neck plane, I should probably do the pickup plane at the same time.

    This isn't nearly as hard as I thought it was going to be, but I'm running into hiccups because it seems the order of my operations is poorly planned. Intuitively, I want to build the model in the same order as a physical build in my garage, but I am seeing that doesn't necessarily work.

    It would be much easier if previous operations were somehow "closed out" when you move on to another one.
     
  4. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    Inventor does stuff like that, but it's also a premium software, so very pricey :lol: I <3 inventor, but I've never actually used it for guitar stuff. Use it daily at the day job though.
     
  5. rainH2O

    rainH2O New Member

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    I was able to extrude the top, then use angled planes to slice away the neck plane and the pickup plane.

    [​IMG]

    The program let me move the slices away, but I still cannot delete them.

    [​IMG]

    I will try to loft the top carve this afternoon.
     
  6. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    Can you suppress them? Or even just turn off visibility?
     
  7. rainH2O

    rainH2O New Member

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    I can make them disappear visibly by unchecking the light bulb by the corresponding body, but everything I cut away still affects new operations as if they were still in place.

    I tried lofting to the neck plane instead of an offset plane parallel to the body. This gave me a top carve with the neck plane "built in". It actually let me slice off the pickup plane and the upper surface of the top. I still could only move the sliced bodies, not delete them.

    [​IMG]

    I ran into issues when I tried to convert the lofted surface to t-splines so I could adjust the contour of the carve. The program built the surface all the way back up as if the sliced away bodies were still in place. Dealing with these phantom entities that I thought I cut away is getting really frustrating. I'm giving up on Fusion 360 and trying out Rhino tonight.
     
  8. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    Rhino is much more manual, but I far prefer it. If you can think of a command, type it and it's probably right.

    I worked in Rhino most of the day today, and it just reminded me how powerful it is over Autocad. Not on the same level as Inventor, but far above Autocad.
     
  9. rainH2O

    rainH2O New Member

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    I did my body outline in Rhino tonight. Spent some time messing around with it to get a feel for what controls are where. I should be able to do a body tomorrow. I hope to do the neck this weekend, and work on CAM next week. I would like to cut a guitar before the end of December.

    One question about the neck joint. Do most guys using CNC use exact measurements or add a few hundredths to tighten it up a bit? I'd rather do a few swipes with a sanding block than have a loose fit.
     
  10. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    You need to be aware of tolerances, such as the actual diameter of your router bit. A lot of spiral cut bits start at the exact size before cutting, so they're a bit smaller than advertised. My spiral cut 1/4" bits are usually .244" or so. My 1/8" bits start with a 1/4" blank so they're dead on at .125"...

    You also don't want to make the pocket too small, you still want maybe a thousandth of clearance.

    The beauty of Rhino is you don't really have to model in solids. Most of my models are surface based with some lines for the routing paths. I use RhinoCAM, but any good CAM software should be able to work with Rhino surfaces and lines.
     
  11. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    Also, learn how to use curve networks in Rhino to make surfaces (command is NetworkSrf), it makes it very easy. Only takes like 4 curves to make a surface, and you can make an entire carved top surface just from a bunch of curves. Most of my surfaces start out as lines, then I use NetworkSrf to make them into a complex surface.

    And DupBorder is a command you should know and love, as is ProjectToCPlane.
     
  12. rainH2O

    rainH2O New Member

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    Any advice on getting the neck plane to a specific angle? I'm pretty comfortable just winging it for the rest of the top carve, but I want to make sure the neck angle is correct.
     
  13. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    I think 4.4° for the neck and 1.2° for the pickup plane have been the standards over at MLP?
     
  14. rainH2O

    rainH2O New Member

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    Yes. I'm asking how to make sure the neck angle I create in Rhino is 4.4 and the pickup plane is 1.2.
     
  15. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    I usually use the rotate command to do stuff like that. Sometimes you have to pick your first rotation point in perspective then switch to front or right view to rotate vertically.
     
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  16. rainH2O

    rainH2O New Member

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    I think I've figured out how I'm going to go about this. I worked with the Rotate3D command today, and I think I have a handle on how it works but I keep "missing" the connection with the front of the guitar when I adjust the angle of my centerline. I drew a centerline. Raised the centerline the height of my top. Inserted a control point 3.5" from the neck join. Used the Rotate3D command to make the neck angle from the control point to the neck join. This puts my control point at the end of the line below the neck join on the Z axis. When I move the line to intersect the neck join, it throws everything off. I'm sure with more tinkering I could figure it out, but I decided to just do a little trigonometry instead.

    My plan now is to draw my centerline, then raise my control point at 3.5" from the neck join. Raising the control point .22" should give me a neck angle of 3.6 degrees (I'm using a .5" top instead of a 5/8" top, so my carve will be shallower - I decided to take the 1/8 off the top instead of below the level of the binding so I don't sacrifice depth of the recurve).

    This leads me to another question. My entire top height above the binding is .25". the end of the neck plane is .22" above the binding. That would make my pickup plane a transition of .03" over a run of 5.5" (a .31 degree angle). Would this even be noticeable? Is there any point of doing a pickup plane with those measurements?
     

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