Binding Router Jigs

Discussion in 'Guitar Building' started by Jim Ball, Jan 30, 2015.

  1. Jim Ball

    Jim Ball New Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2014
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Frontenac, Kansas
    The handmade, handheld router jigs that compensate for the curved top and back have way too much "pucker factor" for me, so I'm looking at various machines.

    The Fleishman style machines and their variations with the parallelogram arm and drawer slide mechanism mounted on a 'Lazy Susan' type table that lets the guitar body stay in a fixed place while the router is moved around the guitar don't do it for me either. It just looks like there are too many joints and bearing surfaces that can introduce errors - especially after it gets some wear on it.

    So, I'm looking at the LMI and Stewmac machines. Does anyone here own either of those, or have firsthand knowledge about how well they work?

    If you have a Fleishman machine, I'd be interested from hearing from you also. I'd be happy to go that route if I was confident in it's performance.
     
  2. otterhound

    otterhound New Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2013
    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    149
    The Fleishman jig works , even though it looks clumsy .
    I have used it .
    If/when I make the plunge , this will be the one unless something better comes along .
    For what it's worth , binding channels are cut using a fixed stationary setup where the guitar body is rotated by hand over it at the Martin factory .
    I would love to know the setup .
    It appears to be a process that does require precise repetitive human operation .
     
  3. Jim Ball

    Jim Ball New Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2014
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Frontenac, Kansas
    I think Kenneth Michael guitars sells something like that. To me, there's still a pucker factor, as the guitar body is hand held. Besides, I do not think it would work for me as I am using the classical Spanish neck style where the neck & body are integral instead of a bolt-on neck.
     
  4. otterhound

    otterhound New Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2013
    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    149
    Yes , there may likely be an issue with that style .
     
  5. otterhound

    otterhound New Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2013
    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    149
    I went to the website . That is not it .
    At Martin they use a setup that essentially has a router mounted horizontally under a table surface .
    The guitar body is held freehand in the setup that they have and rotated over the cutting surface .
    There is no jig holding the guitar , only the person doing the operation .
    I will take a pic or two the next time I am there on the tour . Hopefully , the person will not be on break .
    It is a real treat watching it being done and I have often wondered how many taking the tour really grasp what is being done and how important it is that it be done correctly .
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice