Baked Maple?

Discussion in 'Wood' started by Knarbens, Feb 27, 2015.

  1. Knarbens

    Knarbens Well-Known Member

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    I'm interessted in this stuff and had a few questions coming up. Besides its nice color and the fact there's less movement in the wood - are there more advantages or disadvantages?

    What about protection? Will I have to coat/protect a baked board just as I do on a non-baked maple fretboard?
     
  2. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    If you're using it on a fretboard there isn't much to worry about structurally, as the fretboard doesn't lend a lot to the structure or strength of the neck.

    If you're using it as neck wood, make sure you let it acclimate for a while, you want to let it soak in the moisture it loses during roasting. If you don't acclimate it you'll most likely have issues with warping. I'm not convinced it's more stable myself, my only ever warranty repair was on a roasted maple neck that warped pretty badly after traveling to the customer, and it was fully sealed in lacquer. Could have just been the board (was a board that a customer had sent to Carvin but it warped there and they couldn't use it so they mailed it to me) but that's why I made it a 5 piece neck with bubinga stringers, hoping to counter that.

    As far as finished or unfinished, I'm not sure. I'd imagine it'd still gunk up like maple, but may be less noticeable because it's darker. I've got a customer sending me a Warmoth neck made from roasted maple, and he's intending on leaving everything but the headstock face unfinished.
     
  3. otterhound

    otterhound New Member

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    During the tour at PRS , I asked one of the people there about roasted maple .
    The reply is that they don't use it because it becomes too brittle in their opinion .
    Just passing this on .
     
  4. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely does. Tearout is really common if you route it. I'm using it for fretboards right now and two of the four roasted maple fretboards will be getting binding because of this.
     
  5. Purelojik

    Purelojik New Member

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    my most recent build had a one piece roasted maple neck. it was rift/quartersawn and it had been with me for over a year in various places and was in canada beforehand lol. (i got it from Jon) it never moved, after i planed it down to sized it never moved either. ends werent sealed or anything.

    guitars all built now and it was really wonderful to work with. About the tearout issue i've found that only when using dull router bits or dull tools. Never had a single problem with my sharpened tools. its got an odies oil finish and wax and is smooth as butter. I play it about 1-2 hours a day at my parents home in newport beach california by the ocean where it gets a bit humid so i'll let you know if anything happens lol.
     
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  6. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    I pulled the last roasted maple fretboard off the template and the board broke at two different fret slots. So brittle. I was able to repair it, but still frustrating.
     
  7. Purelojik

    Purelojik New Member

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    really? is this home baked?
     

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