Anyone use Autocad?

Discussion in 'Plans, Designs & Software' started by Sully, May 21, 2015.

  1. Sully

    Sully Well-Known Member

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    Irritating story (somewhat) short:

    I can draw anything with a pencil. I can't draw anything on a computer. I'm pretty computer literate, so it's not a "technology fear" issue. If I'm going to start actually getting use out of a killer CNC machine, I need to get all of my stuff into 2D/3D format. The good news is that I have a decent amount of it done already (headstocks, some body shapes, some inlay patterns, etc). I'd like to get the rest of it done and learn how to do this stuff on my own. Clearly, it's not rocket science, which is good.


    1. I have Rhino for Mac. It's a beta, and is finally at the release candidate stage, so my demo version of it is going to turn into a pumpkin in the somewhat near future. I expect it to be cost prohibitive for now, so I'll probably have to move to something else (unless I can get all of this done soon).

    2. I have Autocad 2015 for Mac and would love to be able to understand how to use it so I can....y'know, use it.

    3. The tutorials I've seen for Autocad 2015 for Mac don't seem to be very beginner oriented, which isn't much of a help.

    4. While I have a virtual machine on my computer that runs Windows, it's got Windows XP on it. I have zero interest in using a Windows based CAD program because it's going to be a hassle, not to mention, slow as hell.

    So...does anyone know of a guitar related tutorial for either Rhino 5 or Autocad 2015? I don't really care to become a superuser, but I'd like to be able to know how to at least connect some stuff together and have it work. I'm pretty much about to fucking snap over it.

    Sully
     
  2. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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  3. Sully

    Sully Well-Known Member

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    I've casually skimmed through that before and I'm checking it out again, but it doesn't (so far) answer my main question of "how?"

    I've been able to do some body tracings, which is awesome, but for things like finding the center of something so I can have a center line, I'm in the dark. It's little stuff, I'm sure.
     
  4. poro78

    poro78 Well-Known Member

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  5. Murkar

    Murkar Well-Known Member

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    TBH, I hate AutoCad. The line-drawing tools are very non-intuitive. As a result I stuck with (get ready for this) Photoshop, which I used to draw all of my blueprints.

    Photoshop of course is not intended to handle vector graphics, and it doesn't integrate well at all with any CAD software. Ultimately I ended converting my paths from PS into illustrator files, which could them be important into both Rhino and AutoCAD (I went with Rhino). Whatever your method, though, the easiest way to make a guitar in Rhino is to use curves. These can then be extruded into solid objects of the desired depth (i.e. you trace your guitar outline, then extrude that outline into a solid object the shape of your body and the correct thickness). From there you can use more extruded shapes to remove the neck pocket and pickup routing cavities using Booleans.

    I found a really good Rhino tutorial video specifically for guitar making.....I will try to find it and post it when I get home.
     
  6. Adam

    Adam Well-Known Member

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    Yeah AutoCAD is awful. Inventor is better but super expensive. I've found Rhino to be much better in all regards than AutoCAD, but I have no idea about the Mac beta. For shop/CAD use, IMO, get a cheapish Windows PC. Mac isn't nearly as robust for CAD stuff, as far as I've seen.
     
  7. Sully

    Sully Well-Known Member

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    Mike Potvin is the greatest human alive.

    Things are so much better right now.

    Sully
     
    poro78 likes this.
  8. fumblefinger

    fumblefinger Member

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    You could always scan in your sketch, overlay it and generate the contours by trial and error with splines or simply circles and lines. Start with it laid out on a center line. "Offset" is your friend. So is "Trim" and "Extend". Spend some time learning how to construct a line perpendicular to a circle or contour. It will be a big help. I used AutoCAD for probably 15 years at the job. Sometimes it helps to remember it was designed for Architects.
     
  9. pshupe

    pshupe Member

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    Sully -- I've used AutoCAD for more than 25 yrs, much less over the last 10 yrs. I worked for Architects and Structural Engineers in that time and now I use REVIT for Architecture.

    I use Rhino for some stuff, which I find much more intuitive than other 3d software. I used 3ds MAX for a number of years as well. I have also used Micro Station and a few others. I think AutoCAD is quite simple but probably because it is like breathing. I have a small CNC machine and the software that comes with it can cut 2d pockets and paths using AutoCAD dwg files very easily. It will also cut 3d contours like a carved top if I model it in Rhino or other 3d modeling software.

    I'd say stick with AutoCAD for now. Let me know if you want a CAD drawing out some of your stuff. I could do it and give you some tips along the way.

    Cheers Peter.

    PS - too bad we weren't able to meet up when I was in DFW last week. Maybe next time.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2015
  10. 87hdrush

    87hdrush Member

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    If you have the time and money take a CAD class at your local community college. while you have student ID and email. Autodesk will sell you their Ultimate Product Design Suite for $150.00 (it retails for over 10 grand) That's Inventor, AutoCAD, sketchbook, 3DS Max, Mudbox and a bunch of other stuff. you will learn from pro's 2 nites a week for 3 to 4 months. and you get a fully functional program (no student watermark) I started with cad and ended up with a two year degree in Mechanical Engineering. One CAD class and the program would cost around $500. You might even get Federal grants that would make it even cheaper. It really speeds up the learning curve.
     
  11. skeels

    skeels New Member

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    I've seen Potvin's name before. Are you sending him sketches? Because I, too, am fond of the pencil.
     
  12. Sully

    Sully Well-Known Member

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    No, he taught me how to do what I needed to do, and got me started in Rhino. :)
     
  13. Helderik

    Helderik New Member

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    Autocad is great, once you get used to it and can be incredibly fast and powerful. I use it at work next to nx and creo which are very high end 3d modellers... Sometimes acad is just faster to create concepts.

    I made a few guitar designs using autocad but nowadays use draftsight which is free at home. 99% of the commands is the same as acad. It also has great tutorials for free!

    Perhaps that can help you. The real trick is to work with layers and object snaps... You can also import pdf files if you convert them to dxf and scale them appropriately. You csn use that for older designs!

    Be aware that free/student versions might not be allowed when you use them professionaly!!!
     
  14. PhazeRCIL

    PhazeRCIL New Member

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  15. fatal-exception

    fatal-exception New Member

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    Maybe it's not the software that is tripping you up, it's the lack of basic drafting skills? Not trying to should harsh here. AutoCAD is and has always been a great tool for the person who already knows how to manually draft. Of course, with this tool there are many shortcuts that we take foregranted, but without them, we would still be able to find the midpoint of a line or the tangent of an arc, ect.

    Maybe the route you should be taking is drafting related, if they teach it using AutoCAD as the tool, even better. Just my thoughts.

    Paul
     

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